Calyptratae Fly

Tachinidae? Photo © Michael Plagens

Many fly species alight in the sushine in order to regulate body temperature.

More Information ...

Blow Fly

A blow fly, family Calliphoridae, © Michael Plagens

The Oriental Latrine Fly is a marvelously irridescent fly of jade and gold. The larva, or maggot, developes within corpses or carrion. Such is the economy of Nature.

More Information.

Blow Fly #2

A different blow fly species, family Calliphoridae, © Michael Plagens

This one is deep cobalt blue. The larva, or maggot, lives in garbage or carrion, maybe of a different condition or type. Such is the variety in Nature.

More Information.

Tachinid Fly

a beneficial tachinid fly © Michael Plagens

These flies visit flowers or alight on leaves, but never gather at garbage or around kitchens. Many species large and small, but most with bristles.

More Information.

Flesh Fly

possible Sarcophagidae, photo © Michael Plagens

Thorax with longitudinal striping. Red eyes.

More Information.

Acalyptrate Fly

A small, unknown fly species © Michael Plagens

Small diptera warming itself in the sunshine. Name and biology a mystery.

More Information.

Muscoid Fly?

possible Muscoid Fly, photo © Michael Plagens

Three dark gray spots on each wing might be a unique trait. Red eyes.

More Information.

Tabanid Fly

Tabanidae: Chrysops, photo © Michael Plagens

Relatively small horse fly with black, patent leather look. Females bite and take blood.

More Information.

Grey and White Fly

Boldly marked dipteran from Kitale Photo © Michael Plagens

Several, not so closely related flies have this same bold pattern.

More Information ...

Root-Maggot Fly

this might be a Anthomyiidae © Michael Plagens

This brightly marked, red-eyed fly was alighted on vegetation in a garden. Eldoret.

More Information.

Root-Maggot Fly

Root-maggot fly, Anthomyiidae, photo © Michael Plagens

Four examples of Anthomyiidae of perhaps four different species?

More Information ...

Root Maggot Fly

Root-Maggot Fly, Anthomyiidae, © Michael Plagens

Yet another fly with v. large eyes and with a black and white pattern on prothorax.

More Information.

Gall Midge

Gall Midge Fly, Cecidomyiidae, © Michael Plagens

My guess (SWAG) is that this shoot gall growth is the result of feeding larvae of a Cecidomyiidae, a mosquito-like fly.

More Information.

Robber Fly

Robber Fly at Taita Hills, Asilidae, photo © Michael Plagens

Robber flies are partial to alighting on exposed, smooth rock surfaces as well as man-made concrete.

More Information.

Robber Fly

Robberfly, Asilidae, photo © Michael Plagens

Active, predatory flies that often alight on rocks or logs in the sunshine. Catches other flying insects, raptor-like.

More Information ...

Robust Robber

A robust robber fly, Asilidae, photo © Michael Plagens

This robber has captured a long-legged nematoceran fly. Notice the very large eyes.

More Information.

Stalk-eyed Fly

A Stalk-eyed Fly, Diopsidae, © Michael Plagens

Males are showy with their strutting behavior on sunny leaves. Only about 8mm long. Eyes and antennae on the stalks!

More Information.

Stalk-eyed Fly #2

Diopsidae with black and white maculations fly photo © Michael Plagens

Bizzare-looking fly with its eyes spaced wide apart on long stalks. This one has black and white markings on the pronotum and the head is red.

More Information ...

Fruit Fly ?

adult fruit fly in display mode photo © Michael Plagens

Males of adult fruit flies display on a leaf or other surface. This one has unmarked wings. Wingspan 5 mm.

More Information ...

Fruit Fly #2

A picture-wing fruit fly, f. Tephritidae, photo © Michael Plagens

Male fruit flies like this one often dance around on an exposed surface to attract a mate.

More Information.

Fruit Fly #4

Culex sp. © Michael Plagens

Wings are marked with dark bands. Similar to #2.

More Information.

Fruit Fly #5

Tephritidae fruit fly at Kakamega photo © Michael Plagens

Many species of wild fruits among the forest trees and shrubs means many kinds of fruit flies.

More Information ...

Signal Fly ?

a Tephritoidea fly at dung, © Michael Plagens

Many species of fruit fly can be found visiting dung. This one has no wing markings.

More Information.

Long-Legged Fly

Dolichopidae run and dance on leaf surfaces. Photo © Michael Plagens

Most Dolichopodidae are iridescent blue or green and have long, slender legs. Often seen on leaves in the sunshine.

More Information ...

Long-legged Fly #2

Dolichopodidae, © Michael Plagens

Dolichopodidae move about fast on long, slender legs. This species has marked wings. Less than 5 mm long.

More Information.

Hover Fly

A Syrphidae hover fly photo © Michael Plagens

Hover Flies, like bees, visit flowers, and presumably can be agents of pollination.

More Information.

Hover Fly

adult syrphidae, Tribe Eristalini, © Michael Plagens

Flies that strongly resemble bees and often visit flowers. Many species classified as Syrphidae. This one has stripes on thorax dorsum.

More Information.

Hover Fly

A hover fly, f. Syrphidae, photo © Michael Plagens

Adult hover flies are frequent visitors at blooming plants where they take nectar.

More Information.

Syrphid Larva

larval form of a syrphid fly photo © Michael Plagens

Legless and slug-like larva lives on plant surfaces where aphids are present. Captures and feeds on aphids.

More Information ...

Bee Fly

A Non-Biting Midge, Chironomidae, © Michael Plagens

Bee Flies do not sting and have one pair of wings instead of two. Often they hover above and then alight on bare soil.

More Information.

Mystery Fly

what family does this fly belong to? Photo © Michael Plagens

This little fly, about 3mm, has some peculiar morphology that might clue a dipterist.

More Information ...

Big-eyed Fly

jet black Bibionidae with huge eyes © Michael Plagens

The eyes are very large, filling the dorsum of the head. Enlarged pronotum. Observed at Kitale.

More Information.

Moth Fly

A Moth Fly, family Psychodidae, © Michael Plagens

These small flies look like tiny moths with feathery wings held flat when sitting. White spotting. Usually near wastewater drainage.

More Information.

Mosquitoes

Culex sp. © Michael Plagens

When traveling in much of Africa it is wise to use bed nets and repellants against mosquitoes which are vectors for a variety of serious diseases.

More Information.

Non-Biting Midge

Chironomidae species © Michael Plagens

Delicate flying insect resembles a mosquito. Immatures are often known as blood­worms.

More Information.

Midge

A Non-Biting Midge, Chironomidae, © Michael Plagens

Chironomid flies look like mosquitoes but do not bite and have wings w/o markings. Adults emerge from water and generally do not feed.

More Information.

Crane Fly

A crane fly, f. Tipulidae, photo © Michael Plagens

Crane flies are so named for their extraordinarily long, slender legs.

More Information.

Fragment Fly

A possible crane fly, f. Tipulidae, photo © Michael Plagens

Crane fly with peculiar perching behavior that makes it look like a dried leaf fragment.

More Information.


Kenya Natural History

Copyright Michael J. Plagens, page created 13 April 2012
updated 6 Oct. 2017.

Disclaimer: By no means am I an expert on the Natural History of Kenya. I am new to exploring this part of the World. By creating a page for the species as I encounter them I am teaching myself. If I make errors I expect that a kind person will let me know so that I can make corrections.